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Monday, July 20, 2020 | History

2 edition of Human curiosities and the Royal Society, 1699-1751. found in the catalog.

Human curiosities and the Royal Society, 1699-1751.

John H. Appleby

Human curiosities and the Royal Society, 1699-1751.

by John H. Appleby

  • 32 Want to read
  • 13 Currently reading

Published .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Royal Society.

  • Edition Notes

    Reprinted from Notes and Records of the Royal Society of London, vol. 50 no. 1 (1996), p. 13-27.

    The Physical Object
    Pagination[15]p. :
    Number of Pages15
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL19777343M

      The Royal Society was many things: a forum for sharing ideas and discoveries, a hub for gathering and disseminating those ideas, and a center for coordinating national and international research. But the demonstration, sponsorship, discussion, and promotion of . 7. Alberti, Morbid Curiosities (n. 1); John Appleby, “Human Curiosities and the Royal Soci-ety, –,” Notes Rec. Roy. Soc. Lon no. 1 (): 13–27; O. R. Impey and Arthur MacGregor, The Origins of Museums: The Cabinet of Curiosities in Sixteenth and Seventeenth-Century.

    The Royal Society originated on Novem , when 12 men met after a lecture at Gresham College, London, by Christopher Wren (then professor of astronomy at the college) and resolved to set up “a Colledge for the promoting of Physico-Mathematicall Experimentall Learning.” Those present included the scientists Robert Boyle and Bishop John Wilkins and the courtiers Sir Robert Moray and. Full text Full text is available as a scanned copy of the original print version. Get a printable copy (PDF file) of the complete article (K), or click on a page image below to browse page by page.

      Ashmole was one of the leading intellectual luminaries of his time: a founding member of the Royal Society, a fellowship and later academy of natural philosophers and scientists; alchemist; astrological advisor to the king; and the creator of the world’s first public s: 8.   His coin collection, comprising s items, was greater than that of George III and likely exceeded only by the French royal holdings. Hunter ow books and manuscripts.


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Human curiosities and the Royal Society, 1699-1751 by John H. Appleby Download PDF EPUB FB2

Human curiosities and the Royal Society, John H. Appleby. Google Scholar. Find this author on PubMed. Search for more papers by this author. John H. Appleby. This certainly applies to the living ‘human curiosities’ in the present paper: they and post-mortem specimens have been selected to illustrate myology and osteology.

Human curiosities and the Royal Society, A sidelight is shed on Topham's later associations with the Royal Society by Thomas Cromwell, in his Walks through Islington ().

A few years prior to the publication of this book, there was a pewter dish in the British Museum marked on. Human curiosities and the Royal Society, John H. Appleby; Published: 01 January Page(s): Towards a history of the Royal Society in the eighteenth century.

Richard Sorrenson; Published: 01 January Page(s): Book review. Of oak and smoke, inter alia. Published: 01 January Page(s). Cambridge Core - History of Science and Technology - Worlds of Natural History - edited by Helen Anne Curry.

Under the duke's patronage, Stone rose to be a very considerable mathematician, and was elected a member of the Royal Society of London, in He seems to have lost the favor of the Duke of Argyle, for, in the latter part of his life, he gave lessons in mathematics, and at last died in poverty.

The book was finally printed in with the title Musaeum Regalis Societatis; or a Catalogue & Description of the Natural and Artificial Rarities belonging to the Royal Society and preserved at Gresham College.

Grew stated his intentions in his preface – unlike previous catalogues of Renaissance noblemen’s ‘cabinets of curiosities. Frederik Ruysch created a cabinet of curiosities in Amsterdam, Netherlands in the s.

It contained both human and animal specimens and was renowned for the imaginative presentations which blurred boundaries between science and art. The collection was purchased by Peter the Great of Russia in and transferred to St Petersburg.

He appears in Zoffany’s painting, Life Class at the Royal Academy (). He also appears in James Barry’s Distribution of the Premiums by the Royal Society of Arts and Manufactures ().

The curiosities he collected are now on display at the University of Glasgow. The Royal Society, formally The Royal Society of London for Improving Natural Knowledge, is a learned society and the United Kingdom's national academy of d on 28 Novemberit was granted a royal charter by King Charles II as "The Royal Society".

It is the oldest national scientific institution in the world. The society fulfils a number of roles: promoting science and its. The Royal Society had often encouraged travellers to make such records and reported on information collected in circumstances that ranged.

32 For more on the curious and curiously public nature of anatomy museums see Alberti, op. cit. (12); Appleby, John, ‘ Human curiosities and the Royal Society, – ’, Notes and Records of the Royal Society of London () 50, pp.

13 – 27; Bates, op. cit. (12). Royal Society’s Journal Books (Vol. 12), p. The Journal Books contain minutes of ordinary meetings of the Royal Society. Minutes of early meetings usually include: the chairman, news of elections to the Fellowship and to Council, non-Fellows given leave to be present and the books and natural and artificial curiosities presented to the.

He appears in Zoffany’s painting, Life Class at the Royal Academy (). He also appears in James Barry’s Distribution of the Premiums by the Royal Society of Arts and Manufactures ().

The curiosities he collected are now on display at the University of Glasgow. Francis Bacon (–) and the Royal Society. Click on an image to enlarge Francis Bacon, Sylva sylvarum: or a Naturall Ten Centuries (London, ). Whilst ancient Greek music theory would continue to interest scientists and music theorists into the 19th century, the 17th century saw a related development in acoustics, or, the science of sound.

This paper is concerned with the reporting and display of curiosities of nature at the meetings of The Royal Society during the first half of the eighteenth century. London: Longman, First Edition.

Disbound. Very Good Condition. Item # 6 pages. Note; this is an original article separated from the volume, not a reprint. An account of the Royal Society's Newton telescope by A. Rupert Hall, F.B.A. and A.D.C. Simpson 1 Human curiosities and the Royal Society, by John H.

Appleby 13 Towards a history of the Royal Society in the eighteenth century by Richard Sorrenson 29 Recording the Aloes at Chelsea - a singular solution to a difficult problem by Ruth Stungo They mature into sausage-like forms (E), and then into infective third stage larvae (F).

These larvae migrate into the fly’s proboscis and are deposited into another human host when they take a blood meal.

Repeat. Photograph of microfilariae (X). Resources. American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene Abstract Book. Vol. N.p.: n.p. Sir Hans Sloane (–) was an English physician, a member of the Royal Society and the Royal College of Physicians, and the founder of the British Museum in London.

He began sporadically collecting plants in England and France while studying medicine. Inthe Duke of Albemarle offered Sloane a position as personal physician to the West Indies fleet at Jamaica. This book is a reproduction of the eighteenth-century four-volume set. These amazing illustrations are works of art, but beware — small children migh Taschen has always published heavy, lush art books, but they've outdone themselves with Cabinet of Natural Curiosities (weighing in at thirteen pounds)/5(50).

Miscellanea curiosa: containing a collection of some of the principal phaenomena in nature, accounted for by the greatest philosophers of this age ; being the most valuable discourses, read and delivered to the Royal society, for the advancement of physical and mathematical knowledge ; as also a collection of curious travels, voyages, antiquities, and natural histories of countries.

This book is pretty much essential reading for anyone interested in the advances in science in the 17th century. For instance, if you have read Edward Dolnick's popular history of the scientific revolution The Clockwork Universe: Isaac Newton, the Royal Society, and the Birth of the Modern World (P.S.), this is pretty much the next step in your s: 1.

But it seems a shame not to consider the same themes in Thomas Shadwell's play The Virtuoso (), in which he satirised the animal-to-human transfusion experiments of the Royal Society. And when.